JOINT LASD AND HSI INVESTIGATION LEADS TO FEDERAL CONVICTIONS

The  Los  Angeles  County  Sheriff’s  Department’s  CAPE  Team  worked  side  by  side  with  The  Intellectual  Property  Rights  Group  from  HSI  and  served  warrants  at  multiple  locations  in  Los  Angeles  and  Montclair.

IC  Investigators  had  identified  a  group  of  individuals  that  were  operating  a  counterfeit  ring  distributing  counterfeit  clothing  and  luxury  goods.  Investigators  had  learned  the  subjects  were  operating  a  warehouse  in  Downtown  Los  Angeles  and  were  storing  additional  goods  at  a  public  storage  facility  in  Montclair.

One  of  the  subjects  was  selling  counterfeit  goods  at  a  local  swap  meet  and  maintaining  a  low  profile,  leading  many  to  believe  that  she  was  just  a  small  time  swap  meet  vendor,  however  the  truth  was  that  she  was  part  of  a  major  organization  and  just  used  the  swap  meet  as  a  means  to  develop  additional  wholesale  customers.

Counterfeiters  are  not  always  who  they  “appear”  to  be.  Over  the  years,  we  have  seen  counterfeiters  do  a  great  job  at  masking  who  they  really  are  and  how  deeply  involved  they  really  are  in  the  counterfeit  trade.

Federal  agents  were  able  to  get  an  introduction  into  one  of  the  master  minds  of  the  organization  and  they  were  able  to  identify  the  counterfeit  network  and  where  they  had  stored  all  their  counterfeit  goods.  Federal  search  warrants  were  obtained  and  served  at  all  the  locations  involved  in  the  counterfeit  ring.

The  search  lead  to  the  seizure  of  over  a  million  dollars  in  counterfeit  goods  and  the  arrests  of  the  two  primary  subjects.  One  of  the  subjects  had  multiple  prior  state  convictions  for  trademark  counterfeiting  and  was  eventually  sentenced  to  two  years  in  federal  prison  and  he  will  likely  be  deported  after  he  serves  his  time.  The  second  subject  was  also  convicted  and  sentenced  to  a  year  in  federal  custody.

This  case  was  a  great  example  of  federal  and  state  agencies  working  together  to  take  down  a  major  organization.

Kris Buckner, Investigative Consultants

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

Gangs and Counterfeiting

The  problem  continues  to  grow  as  gangs  and  other  criminal  organizations  continue  to  realize  that  trademark  counterfeiting,  piracy  and  other  intellectual  property  crimes  present  great  opportunities  to  make  lots  of  cold  hard  cash.

These  criminals  see  the  opportunities  and  they  quickly  jump  on  them.  There  is  no  shortage  of  willing  consumers  to  buy  the  latest  knock  off  handbag  or  pirated  music  CD  and  the  gangsters  know  it.

The  LAPD  and  FBI  recently  arrested  a  gang  member  from  Florencia  13.  The  gangster,  known  as  “Flaco”    had  already  been  arrested  and  prosecuted  by  local  authorities  once,  but  like  many  others  he  was  lured  back  to  the  counterfeit  trade  because  of  the  large  profits.   

Flaco  was  prosecuted  federally  and  convicted.  He  will  serve  time  in  federal  prison  and  then  he  will  likely  be  receiving  a  free  ride  outside  of  the  United  States  as  he  was  not  in  the  USA  legally.     

The  public  needs  to  be  educated  that  the  profits  from  the  sales  of  counterfeit  goods  are  going  to  gangs,  such  as  Florencia  13,  MS  13,  18TH  Street,  The  Bloods,  The  Crips,  and  the  Mexican  Mafia.

 We  applaud  the  outstanding  efforts  to  address  the  problem  of  intellectual  property  crimes  as  it  is  not  always  seen  as  a  serious  crime,  however  those  that  are  in  the  “know”  understand  how  serious  these  crimes  really  are  and  how  these  crimes  are  a  major  source  to  gangs,  organized  crimes  groups,  and  terrorist  organizations.

 Here is a link to a short clip on our YouTube channel explaining a little bit more about the relationships that gangs and counterfeiters have.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.